Good News: The Resurgence of the Honey Bee, An Animal Vitally Important to the Health of Humans and the Entire Earth Ecosystem


Honeybee and milk thistle (image credit: Wikimedia Commons)

 

ohDEER is the leader in all natural deer, mosquito, and tick control.

Here on this blog we mix things up in terms of topics and subjects.  Sure, we blog about our business and services, but in that we at ohDEER are lovers of nature and the outdoors … and in that our co-founder and co-owner, Kurt Upham, is an enthusiastic outdoorsman … we also post here about matters and issues pertaining to protecting and sustaining nature.

After all, all of us … all of us living beings and creatures on this planet … are all in it together.

A living being, a creature, who is among the planet’s most industrious and productive, and upon whose health the well-being of all humanity and the broader earth ecosystem depends, is the honeybee (apis mellifera).

Honeybees are nature’s all-star pollinators – those animals who transfer pollen, produced by the stamen, the male organ of a plant, to the stigma, a component of the female organ of a plant.  This transfer allows for fertilization, and the birth of new plants, and the continuation of a species.

Without pollinators, plants would face a big-time problem.  And that means other living things would face a big-time problem – for plants make possible a considerable percentage of the food we eat, whether it is plant life we eat directly, or the meat we eat that comes from animals who eat plant life for survival.

Therefore, major concern arose back in the winter of 2006-2007 when U.S. beekeepers started to notice a significant decrease in their honeybee hive populations – worker bees especially. Hives were left with a queen and plenty of honey, but not enough workers … conditions that put the future of the hive in jeopardy.

During this period, wild honeybee numbers were also falling.

Scientists and beekeepers determined that several factors contributed to the population decline. Chief among those factors were invasive pests, disease, pesticides, and a changing climate.

Colony collapse disorder was the name assigned the phenomenon of the tumbling honeybeenumbers.

At least in the U.S., colony collapse disorder continued for a few years.  Actually, if you click here you will be taken to Scientific American story, “Growth Industry: HoneybeeNumbers Expand Worldwide as U.S. Decline Continues,” published on May 18, 2009, and written by Katherine Harmon.

Things seemed dire.  But, alas, the sky has not continued to fall.

Actually, the sky is healthy … just fine.

Consider this excerpt from a Newsweek story, “Saving the Bees: Honeybee Populations on the Rise After Colony Collapse Disorder,” published on August 3, 2017:

“ … new data give some reason for optimism. According to a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture released Tuesday, honeybee populations are on the rise. As of April, an estimated 2.89 million bee colonies existed across the U.S., an increase of 3 percent compared to April 2016.”

Please click here to be taken to the full story, which is written by Janice Williams.

Yes, good news.

And smart and considerate and consistent stewardship … and custodianship … of nature supports keeping the honeybee population healthy, and this directly supports and is integral to keeping Planet Earth healthy as well.

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