THE BALD EAGLE, OUR NATIONAL EMBLEM, IS MAKING A COMEBACK … ACROSS AMERICA


(This post was update on February 23, 2018)

A bald eagle perched on ice in Halifax, MA (Image credit: Michael Snow)

 

“It is never too late to go quietly to our lakes, rivers, oceans, even our small streams, and say to the sea gulls, the great blue herons, the bald eagles, the salmon, that we are sorry.”

BRENDA PETERSON

 

ohDEER is the leader in all natural deer, mosquito, and tick control.

In 2018, we entered our second decade in business.

ohDEER serves an ever-growing request and need for all-natural solutions – those that contain no toxins and no harsh chemicals – and which effectively keep properties free of deer and mosquitoes and ticks.

Yes, deer spending time on your property is often not good because they are hosts for disease-carrying ticks, with these ticks transmitters of disease to humans, pets, and livestock.  Deer also chomp on and make a meal of shrubs, flowers, branches, leaves … and other plant forms and parts.

Of course, ticks don’t need deer to make it on to your property, but they won’t trespass there when they detect an ohDEER solution.  Mosquitoes, which also can spread disease to humans, pets, and livestock, don’t like ohDEER solutions any more than ticks do.

The ohDEER corporate headquarters is located in Wayland, MA.   Out of this office we service Metropolitan Boston West and Central Massachusetts.  Our franchise business, launched back in 2013, now has seven franchisees, with each office dedicated to covering one of the following geographic areas: North of Boston, South of Boston, Central Massachusetts, Southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod and the Islands, Eastern Long Island (NY), and Central New Jersey.

A primary inspiration that founded ohDEER, and one held by those in our customer base, is a love of the outdoors and nature.  We do our part in making the outdoors and nature safe and hospitable for people and their pets, and farm animals.

ohDEER likes to, in this space, from time to time, discuss and report on the natural world, and conservation, whether or not that discussion or reporting ties directly to the focus of the ohDEER business.

Today we talk about the most happy circumstance of the growth of the bald eagle  (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America, the only region in which this bird of prey, aka raptor, is found.

Front of the Great Seal of the United States

Yes, the majesty and grace of our national animal, our national bird, … our national emblem … is becoming more frequently sighted.   Seen more and more is that powerful bird, an image of which is featured on the front of the Great Seal of the United States,

Bald eagles had once been abundant on the continent, yet during the 20th century, hunting, development and removal of bald eagle habitat, and, during the 1950s and 1960s, use of the pesticide DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) in the United States, brought the bird to the point of extinction.

As for the threat that DDT posed, the chemical found its way into fish, a primary food source for bald eagles.  When the eagles ingested the fish, the eagles might become sick and even die, and the DDT also played havoc with the reproductive system of eagles, inhibiting their ability to produce calcium needed to make strong shells on the eggs that the eagles laid.  The eggs had weak shells, or no shells at all, which made precarious the survival of the chicks.  A specific deadly threat posed to the chicks not protected by a strong shell is that adult eagles, while roosting, would crush the babies.

In 1967, the federal government declared the bald eagle an endangered species.

During the 1970s, actions of federal and state government, often with these sectors of government working in unison, and the work of individuals and private agencies, took the lead in spurring the protection of the bald eagle and the growth of its numbers.  Among those actions was, in 1972, a federal ban on the use of DDT.

Please click here to be taken to a place dedicated to information on bald eagles –  including info on efforts to recover and protect the species – at the website of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

The broad-based, focused, and committed campaign to safeguard bald eagles and bring them back has been successful.  In 2007, bald eagles were removed from the endangered species list.

Actually, even when there were large numbers of bald eagles in North America, in Massachusetts – the state where ohDEER is based – had relatively few.  Bald eagles are a “rare breeder” in the state.

In the 1970s, there were no known bald eagles in Massachusetts, with, prior to that period, the most recent sighting of bald eagles nesting in Massachusetts dating back to around 1900.

The bald eagle would make its return to the Bay State,

In 1982, the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and Mass Audubon joined ranks on a project – one that would become a winner – to reintroduce bald eagles to Massachusetts.

Consider this excerpt, from the Mass Audubon website, describing results of the project:

“During the 2012 breeding season there were 38 territorial Bald Eagle pairs, of those, 27 pairs incubated eggs, producing a total of 31 chicks who survived the nestling stage and fledged. Once the young eagles are able to find food on their own (usually in late summer), the parents go their separate ways.”

 

If you click on this link you will be transported to the section of the Mass Audubon website devoted to bald eagles.

Hear!! … Hear!! … we call out on the reemergence of our winged national emblem.

On this blog, in August, we will publish an update on the return of the bald eagle to Massachusetts, and other areas in North America.

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